PGNC News and Notes, October 12, 2018

Club Event

Thursday October 18, 7 to 9 p.m., Presentation on Amphibians in Central and Northern BC, The Exploration Place

Amphibians in central/northern British Columbia are uniquely adapted to seemingly inhospitable winter climates. These species are typically near the northern extent of their ranges, and likely migrated into the geographic region within the last 10,000 years. Cherie Mosher, a PhD Candidate at the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC), will talk about known ways amphibians have migrated into central/northern BC, and how they survive the winters. In addition, Cherie will present her work on the coastal tailed frog (Ascaphus truei) of the Coastal Mountains. This ancient species has an unusual life history and, potentially, an even more unusual history and future in British Columbia. This event is brought to us in partnership with The Exploration Place. Everyone welcome (Bob Steventon photos).

Frog Bob

Toad

Club News

 
Club Membership
First-time members can sign up as of October 1 and enjoy membership to December 31, 2019. Arrive a few minutes early for the October 18 presentation and we’ll be happy to process your membership. Or sign up through the Club website at: https://pgnc.wordpress.com/membership/Individual membership is $25 per year, and family membership is $40. Student membership is $15. Membership year is January 1 to December 31.
New Email address
The Club now has a new email address: Princegeorgenaturalistsclub@gmail.com We will continue to monitor the previous email account.
 

Notes

1. UNBC Student Chapter of The Wildlife Society (TWS) Photo Contest, October 15 to 19

Information provided by David Breault on behalf of TWS: This year, our annual photo and calendar contest will be held from October 15th to the 19th. Photo submissions will be from Monday to Wednesday, with voting taking place on Thursday October 18 and Friday October 19. 

Submissions will be $5 for the first picture. For additional photos, club members pay an additional $1 per photo, non-club members pay an additional $2 per photo for 3 for a maximum of three photos. Photos must be 8 x 10 inches, and must be dropped off in person at our table at the TWS table in the UNBC Winter Garden. 
Submissions will be Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday next week, and must be made in person. The table will be set up from 10-4. Voting on photos must also be done in person at the table, from 8-4 on Thursday and Friday. Your photos do not need to be taken in BC, but they do need to be species found in BC.


Voting takes place on the 18th and 19th. Anyone and everyone can submit and vote for photos, so tell your friends! For first, second, and third place, we bring in a panel of our favourite professors to judge, and student voting is for people’s choice! 

There are prizes! The top photos that come out of the contest will go into the TWS calendar! All proceeds of the calendar sales go to the Northern Lights Wildlife Shelter in Smithers, so we want to sell as many calendars as we for them! Queries about the contest should go to tws@unbc.ca
2. Geological Tour Guide for Prince George
For anyone interested in the geology of our area, there’s an updated geological tour guide for Prince George from the Geological Survey of Canada at:
 
Editor’s Note: This publication is full of colourful graphics and information about all the geological features we hike in, drive through, and photograph on a regular basis (thanks to Mike Nash for forwarding this).
 
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PGNC News and Notes, October 8, 2018

Club Events

Wednesday Walkers, October 10, McMillan Regional Park

We’ll walk in hilly McMillan Regional Park at a leisurely pace to enjoy the rich woodland and the view from the top of the cutbanks. We meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. There we sign a waiver form and arrange for carpooling. Departure time is 9:30 a.m., with return in the noon hour. Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to members and non-members. If you accept a ride to the walk site, please chip in a Toonie for gas.  For more information, or to join an email contact list, contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca.

Thursday October 18, 7 to 9 p.m., Presentation on amphibians, The Exploration Place

Cherie Mosher of UNBC will talk about amphibian ecology in North Central BC. This event is brought to us in partnership with The Exploration Place. Everyone welcome.

Ed note: As background, here is some key information about BC amphibians: https://tinyurl.com/yb4nwve8

Club Membership

First-time members can sign up as of October 1 and enjoy membership to December 31, 2019. Come a few minutes early to the October 18 presentation and we’ll be happy to process your membership. Or sign up through the Club website at: https://pgnc.wordpress.com/membership/

Club Reports

Thursday September 20, Panel on Citizen Science

Three dozen attendees enjoyed a panel presentation and discussion about how people in Prince George, North America, and around the world actually participate in citizen science. The Prince George Public Library co-hosted the event, and set out displays of books of interest. Special thanks to David Breault, Jack Bowling and Heather Meier for the helpful information they shared and to Angie Joiner for pulling it all together. The  citizen science hand-out provides links to many citizen science initiatives whether you are interested in birds, fish, bugs, and everything in between, and includes free smartphone apps. If you find more sites to add to the list, please email the information to the Club at pgnaturalists@hotmail.ca and we will add to the citizen science links soon to be located on the blog.

And here is an extensive article in the Globe and Mail on the contributions of citizen scientists to overall scientific knowledge of butterflies: https://tinyurl.com/y8b9esps as well as a link to UBC’s e-flora site where plant lovers can enter data and photos: http://ibis.geog.ubc.ca/biodiversity/eflora/

Wednesday Walkers, September 26, Cranbrook Greenway off Westcrest Drive (report by Dora Hunter)

We began our walk at the end of Westcrest Drive, where, in this summer of wildfires, a fire had been put out in its infancy, saving Prince George from the fate of some other communities in the province. On the Greenway, we found fungi to be few and far between, but, as Darilyn’s photo shows, we did find a small clump which served to demonstrate some of the many features a mycologist would note in the identification of a mushroom. Darilyn’s photo of the Orange Jelly captures the beauty of this specimen, which until recent rains was a crusty splotch on this conifer stump.  Can you spot the Wood Frog (Rana sylvatica) in Miguel’s photo? It can withstand the cold temperatures of northern B.C. by converting liver glycogen to glucose and moving it into its cells, to serve as antifreeze. Any water is confined to body cavities and between cells where ice crystals do no harm. Another wonderful overwintering adaptation is that of the Black-capped Chickadee (Parus atricapillus), which on winter nights, as an energy conserving strategy, decreases its body temperature by about half. In our on-going quest to identify the mosses, Sandra demonstrated the defining points of Step Moss (Hylocomium splendens) (Photo: Miguel).

Sandra’s Checklist for the 26th

  • Common Raven–stay for the winter.
  • White-winged Crossbill — could stay for the winter; they go where the food
  • is (cones), and it doesn’t matter what time of year it is.
  • Golden-crowned Kinglet — a few will overwinter.
  • Pine Siskin —   usually leave, some milder winters we have some.
  • Black-capped Chickadee — will overwinter.
  • Pileated Woodpecker — will overwinter.
Oct 6 1
Oct 6 2
Oct 6 3
Oct 6 4

Notes

Tuesday October 30, Northwest Invasive Plant Council AGM, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Smithers BC
Please join the Northwest Invasive Plant Council’s Board of Directors, staff and invasive plant specialists and  invasive plant management contractors at our 2018 AGM and member’s meeting. RSVP to manager@nwipc.org as lunch is provided.
NWIPC 2018 AGM Invitation
Tiny Lichens to Giant Trees: An inventory of the Robson Valley Flora
The September 14, 2018 colloquium “Tiny lichens to giant trees: An inventory of the Robson Valley flora” by Dr. Curtis Bjork is now available to watch online. This excellent presentation is about the amazing inventory of flora that has recently been done mostly in our local mountain parks, Sugarbowl-Grizzly, Ancient Forest/Chun T’oh Whudujut, Slim Creek etc:
Eskers Provincial Park is 30 years old!
2018 is the 30th anniversary year of the establishment of Eskers Provincial Park, which was fast-tracked by the outgoing environment minister of the day. Fall is one of the best times to visit the park, as depicted in the following video. The notes accompanying (below) the YouTube presentation outline some of Eskers Provincial Park’s history. What you might not know is that the park was nearly doubled in size in the late 1990s as part of British Columbia’s protected area strategy, and we have yet to explore the extension which also remains undeveloped: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sz-KIohRoNc
For anyone visiting or new to BC’s interior, Mike Nash’s YouTube channel has over 50 slide-show videos covering many outdoor aspects of Prince George and North Central British Columbia, as well as farther afield: https://www.youtube.com/user/TMKNE/videos  (with thanks to Mike Nash for this information)

 

PGNC News and Notes, September 20, 2018

Club Events

Wednesday Walkers, September 26, Cranbrook Hill Greenway off Westcrest Drive

We will access the Greenway from the end of Westcrest Drive on Cranbrook Hill. Last fall this area was a fairyland of fungi, and, with luck, recent rainy weather will ensure another bumper crop. We meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. There we sign a waiver form and arrange for carpooling. Departure time is 9:30 a.m., with return in the noon hour. Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to members and non-members. If you accept a ride to the walk site, please chip in a Toonie for gas.  For more information, or to join an email contact list, contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca.

Club Reports

Wednesday Walkers, September 12, Moore’s Meadow Nature Park

(Submitted by Dora Hunter)

After a chilly night and with snowflakes in the air, the ants in their many hills were all tucked in under their thatched rooves. There were, however, birds to be seen and heard. Here is Sandra Kinsey’s list for the day with her notes on likely migratory behaviour.

Northern Flicker —   some will overwinter
Black-capped Chickadee —  will overwinter
Red-breasted Nuthatch  —  most will overwinter
Brown Creeper  —   some will overwinter
Golden-crowned Kinglet — a few will overwinter
Ruby-crowned Kinglet —  all will leave
American Robin —  a couple will stay in town
Pine Siskin  —   usually leave, some winters we have some
Dark-eyed Junco —   a few will overwinter, but usually in town
Yellow-rumped Warbler  —  all will leave

Notes

Friday September 21, NRESi Colloquium, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., UNBC Room 8-164
 
This Friday’s (Sept 21st) NRESi colloquium will feature Dr. Roy Rea who will be giving the presentation, “You Cannot Love Softwoods and Hate Hardwoods … and Other Thoughts About Silvicultural Racism by a Flaming Moosologist”. Room 8-164 – 3:30 – 4:30 pm.
image001

 

Saturday September 22, Ethnobotany Workshop, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

David Douglas Botanical Garden Society presents an Ethnobotany workshop with Carla Burton. Presentation on plant uses by local First Nations for food, medicine, spirituality, and technology. Short walk to examine native plants. Making Devil’s Club and Rose Hip salves with native plants to take home. Location: Lab 8-325, Teaching Laboratory at UNBC

DDBGS members $25. Non-members $60 (includes a DDBGS membership). To register or for more information contact Anne at secretary@ddbotgarden.bc.ca Participants to bring a sharp paring knife, sturdy gloves, and a mallet for crushing rose hips. Registration for non-members will be open on September 16th.

Carla2018

 

Thursday September 27, Documentary Screening, 5 p.m., UNBC Room 7-212

In partnership with the Green Centre, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS) will be screening the documentary film Directly Affected on Thursday, September 27th at 5:00 pm in room 7-212. Free refreshments. (Sub-title is Pipeline Under Pressure relating to the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion).

 

PGNC News and Notes, September 16, 2018

Club Events

Thursday September 20, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Citizen Science, Prince George Public Library
The Club’s first presentation of the fall season is at the Bob Harkins Branch of the Prince George Public Library. It’s a panel discussion about how local nature enthusiasts contribute extensively to scientific knowledge regarding the birds, plants and animals whose world we share. This will be a fun evening and everyone is welcome to attend!
Citizen-Science-poster.jpg

 

Club Reports

September 9, Mushroom Walk in Wilkins Regional Park

The mushroom walk began with 99 people of all ages meeting to carpool to Wilkins Regional Park on a beautiful Saturday morning. It was nice to see families with small children, students from the college and university, as well as many club members attending. The large and diverse group assembled around our amazing mycologists at the park. Dr. Keith Egger, Dr. Hugues Massicotte, and Linda Tackaberry encouraged everyone to split off and explore the park in smaller groups to look for mushrooms. They feared there may have been more people than mushrooms! Despite this, the group managed to collect roughly 60 species of fungi within just over an hour. Everyone reconvened at the picnic area to display their finds. The earthstar and coral fungi were group favorites, while the stinkhorn mushroom could definitely clear a room. Thank you to all who attended and to our excellent leaders for making the event a success. If anyone has photos from the day, please post them on the event page in the PGNC group discussion on Facebook. (report by David Breault)

August 25 Weed Cleanup at Carrie Jane Gray Park
Here’s the hardworking crew who stayed longer than scheduled, to finish the Himalayan Balsam cleanup – until next year!
Weed Cleanup Carrie Jane Gray Pk 20180825 SKinsey IMG_0125

Notes

Saturday September 22, Ethnobotany Workshop, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

David Douglas Botanical Garden Society presents an Ethnobotany workshop with Carla Burton. Presentation on plant uses by local First Nations for food, medicine, spirituality, and technology. Short walk to examine native plants. Making Devil’s Club and Rose Hip salves with native plants to take home. Location: Lab 8-325, Teaching Laboratory at UNBC

DDBGS members $25. Non-members $60 (includes a DDBGS membership). To register or for more information contact Anne at secretary@ddbotgarden.bc.ca Participants to bring a sharp paring knife, sturdy gloves, and a mallet for crushing rose hips. Registration for non-members will be open on September 16th.

 

Carla2018

PGNC News and Notes, September 8, 2018

Club Events

Mushroom Walk, Sunday September 9

Join us for a fun and educational fungi field trip in Wilkins Regional Park. The walk will be led by Dr. Keith Egger and Dr. Hugues Massicotte, both enthusiastic and expert mycologists. Because Wilkins is a public park, we will leave our collecting baskets at home and leave any harvesting to the leaders. What to bring: sturdy footwear and weather-appropriate clothing, water bottle, a light snack and enthusiasm! A magnifying glass and a camera will also be useful. Carpooling will be organized, and the travel fee for passengers will be $3. Meet under the big Save-On sign at Spruceland Mall at 9:20 a.m. to sign waivers. Departure will be at 9:30 am. This outing is open to members and non-members. Please email any questions to davidnobreault@gmail.com.

mushroom walk poster (2)

Wednesday Walkers, September 12, Moore’s Meadow Nature Park

We will visit Moore’s Meadow Nature Park entering and exiting from Dornbierer Crescent. We meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. There we sign a waiver form and arrange for carpooling. Departure time is 9:30 a.m., with return in the noon hour. Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to members and non-members. If you accept a ride to the walk site, please chip in a Toonie for gas.  For more information, or suggestions, or to join an email contact list, contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca.

Citizen Science Panel Discussion, Prince George Public Library, Thursday September 20, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

The Club’s first presentation of the fall season is at the Bob Harkins Branch of the Prince George Public Library. Come and learn about how local nature enthusiasts contribute extensively to scientific knowledge regarding the birds, plants and animals whose world we share. Everyone welcome!

Citizen-Science-poster.jpg

Club Reports

August 22, Forests for the World Shane Lake Trail

It was a smoky day that found just four of us making our way around Shane Lake with a side trip down to the boggy edge of Reflection Lake. Thank you, Miguel, for photographing these interesting sights along the way. Were the claw marks on the aspen made by a bear retreating from a threat, or one after the sweet buds in spring? Yes, that is a Red-osier Dogwood (Cornus stolonifera) with its berry showing a blue tinge rather than the more usual white. (Submitted by Dora Hunter)

A83E7618EEF1425EA1DE89F05846B8B5 AACFD35521F44A2FB9CADCB04D819EDA

Notes

Friday September 14, Tiny lichens to giant trees: An inventory of the Robson Valley Flora, 3:30 p.m.

Speaker is Dr. Curtis Bjork, Co-curator of Lichens, UBC Herbarium, Beaty Biodiversity Museum. This is the first NRESi Colloquium of the fall season. Location is UNBC, Room 8-164 at 3:30 p.m.

Saturday September 22, Ethnobotany Workshop, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

David Douglas Botanical Garden Society presents an Ethnobotany workshop with Carla Burton. Presentation on plant uses by local First Nations for food, medicine, spirituality, and technology. Short walk to examine native plants. Making Devil’s Club and Rose Hip salves with native plants to take home. Location: Lab 8-325, Teaching Laboratory at UNBC

DDBGS members $25. Non-members $60 (includes a DDBGS membership). To register or for more information contact Anne at secretary@ddbotgarden.bc.ca Participants to bring a sharp paring knife, sturdy gloves, and a mallet for crushing rose hips. Registration for non-members will be open on September 16th.

Carla2018.jpg

American Kestrel Nest Box Program 
The British Columbia American Kestrel Nest Box Program is a Citizen Scientist initiative that involves the installation of nest boxes in BC to help kestrels find safe and secure places to nest and to facilitate observation and monitoring by citizen scientists. American kestrels, or kestrels for short, are the blue, brown, white and orange birds that are about the size of a Steller’s jay that are often seen perched on power lines hunting for agricultural pest species including voles, mice and grasshoppers. Kestrels are the smallest falcon in North America and are also a cavity nesting species that readily use nest boxes.

This fall 2018, I am seeking suitable locations to install the kestrel nest boxes throughout the majority of BC. The preferred habitat for kestrels is pasture, hay land and orchards. However, the habitat can also be a mix including some agriculture. If you would like to volunteer to have a kestrel nest box installed on your property and/or to observe/monitor any nest box(es) please contact myself, Mitchell Warne, at info@warneinthewild.com. Additional information can be found at https://www.warneinthewild.com/bc-kestrel-nest-box-program
IMG_9009

PGNC News and Notes, September 2, 2018

Club Events

Mushroom Walk, Sunday September 9

Join us for a fun and educational fungi field trip in Wilkins Regional Park. The walk will be led by Dr. Keith Egger and Dr. Hugues Massicotte, both enthusiastic and expert mycologists. Because Wilkins is a public park, we will leave our collecting baskets at home and leave any harvesting to the leaders. What to bring: sturdy footwear and weather-appropriate clothing, water bottle, a light snack and enthusiasm! A magnifying glass and a camera will also be useful. Carpooling will be organized, and the travel fee for passengers will be $3. Meet under the big Save-On sign at Spruceland Mall at 9:20 a.m. to sign waivers. Departure will be at 9:30 am. This outing is open to members and non-members. Please email any questions to davidnobreault@gmail.com. A poster is attached for sharing.

mushroom walk poster (2)

Panel Discussion on Citizen Science, Prince George Public Library, Thursday September 20, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

The Club’s first presentation of the fall season is at the Bob Harkins Branch of the Prince George Public Library. Come and learn about how local nature enthusiasts contribute extensively to scientific knowledge regarding the birds, plants and animals whose world we share. Everyone welcome!

Club Reports

Weed Harvest at Carrie Jane Gray Park, August 25, 2018 (submitted by Sandra Kinsey)
Despite the rain and dark skies, seven optimistic, hard-working souls met for the annual Himalayan Balsam removal at Carrie Jane Gray Park. We filled 12 big black garbage bags with whole plants! We also filled four bags full of tansy and thistle. And the weather? No rain at all! The weather was excellent and the smoke barely noticeable. Thanks to Dora, Nancy, Anne, Miguel and Ric for participating, and a special thank you to Penni Adams, the Northwest Invasive Plant Council Program Manager, for encouraging us and being right in there with us. Penni wrote up the account on Himalayan Balsam below.

Himalayan balsam/Policeman’s helmet

Impatiens glandulifera

Himalayan Balsam

Stem, flowers, leaves: Photos courtesy the BC Invasive Species Council

Himalayan balsam is an ornamental annual with pink to purplish-pink, helmet-shaped flowers – hence its other common name, “Policeman’s helmet”. It arrived in North America from its native Himalayan mountains and was widely sold as a garden ornamental. Where it was once considered a garden beauty it has become a garden nuisance. It thrives in moist, shaded locations throughout BC, except in the far northwest. Improper disposal and seed dispersal have resulted in the plant establishing dense, large stands in our natural landscape, in particular along watercourses. It is now classified as an invasive plant.

The stems are bamboo-like and can be over 3 cm in diameter. Leaves are along stem and branches with flowers carried on long thin stalks arising from the intersection of leaf and stem. Roots are extremely fibrous and shallow resulting in destabilizing stream banks. Plants can regrow from cut stems.

It grows rapidly and produces seed pods, which explode at a touch sending seeds up to 3 metres or more. Check out this You Tube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVNO-K8l3hE. Each plant is capable of producing up to 2,500 buoyant seeds which may travel through a watercourse up to 10 km before germinating in spring. The seeds are also spread by human interactions.

Removing Himalayan balsam by digging and pulling is relatively easy due to its shallow root structure. Removal of the complete plant should be done before fruit (seed pods) begin to ripen to avoid seed dispersal. It is recommended that removal occur several times over a growing season as seeds continue to germinate when conditions are favourable. Ongoing monitoring of sites and downstream areas is required due to the seed dispersal. Adverse implication for the Hudson Bay Wetlands is the establishment of Himalayan balsam in the area of restoration. The PG Naturalists have done several Himalayan balsam pulls in Carrie Jane Grey Park along a small, intermittent stream flowing into the Wetlands.

 

 

PGNC News and Notes, August 20, 2018

Club Events

Wednesday Walkers, Forests for the World Lookout and Shane Lake, August 22

Our walking route will depend on how much smoke is in the air. If the skies have cleared, we’ll include Shane Lake and the Lookout. The latter reached by easy slopes. If it stays hazy, we’ll walk around Shane Lake with a stop over-looking Reflection Lake. We meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. There we sign a waiver form and arrange for carpooling. Departure time is 9:30 a.m., with return in the noon hour. Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to members and non-members. If you accept a ride to the walk site, please chip in a Toonie for gas.  For more information, or to join an email contact list, contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca.

Invasive Plant Cleanup at Carrie Jane Park, Saturday August 25, 9 a.m. to 12 noon

On Saturday August 25 you’re invited to help remove flowers and seed heads of invasive Himalayan balsam and common tansy at Carrie Jane Gray Park. The plants are growing on the banks of the canals that feed into the Hudson’s Bay Wetland Nature Park. The Club is concerned that these invasives will spread into inaccessible parts of the Wetland toward the Fraser River. For more information about Himalayan balsam and common tansy see: http://nwipc.org/invasive-plants

Long pants, long-sleeved shirts and sturdy, water-proof footwear are recommended (no sandals or open-toed shoes) as we will be working in wet areas. If possible, bring your own hand tool for cutting off flowers and seed heads, work gloves and a personal water bottle. Long bladed trimmers are also useful. The Club will provide garbage bags as well as extra work gloves and clippers if someone needs them. The work is suitable for adults and teens. We will meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 8:55 a.m. a.m. for a 9 a.m. departure time, to sign a waiver and arrange car-pooling. For volunteers who arrive after 9 a.m., the site is accessible from Massey Drive at Laverdure Way, behind the YWCA, past the horseshoe pits, then follow the paved road. You’ll see us in the small gravel parking lot at the far end of Carrie Jane Gray Park. This event is open to members and non-members. For more information, email Sandra at sjkinsey@direct.ca, voice: 250.963.8381 and text: 250.617.8381.

Presentation on Citizen Science, Prince George Public Library, Thursday September 20, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

The Club’s first presentation of the fall season is at the Bob Harkins Branch of the Prince George Public Library. Come and learn about how the efforts of local non-scientists contribute extensively to scientific knowledge regarding the birds, plants and animals whose world we share. More details coming soon!

Planning for other monthly presentations is in the works. If you would like to make a presentation on a nature-related topic, with people who share your love of the outdoors, please email the Club Executive at pgnaturalists@hotmail.ca.

Club Reports

2018 August 8th Report — Ferguson Lake Nature Reserve

At Ferguson Lake, Miguel photographed two plants with interesting survival strategies. Bastard Toadflax (Geocaulon tividum) is hemiparasitic, gaining nutrition in part from photosynthesis and in part from other plants. On the other hand Indian-Pipe or Ghost flower (Monotropa uniflora) is parasitic gaining nutrition through a fungal connection with trees. The characteristic rectangular holes were made by a Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) whose acute sense of hearing told it of the Carpenter ants to be found in the tree. Note the size of the wood chips created. The tree and the intriguing crooked berry stalks of the Clasping Twistedstalk (Streptopus amplexifolius) were also photographed by Miguel. Darilyn’s photo captures the beauty of the red-spotted, yellow trumpet of the Yellow Monkey-flower (Mimulus guttatus) a plant of damp, seepage areas. You can’t see it, but that is a Skunk Cabbage holding the group’s rapt attention on the boardwalk as seen by Darilyn. (Submitted by Dora Hunter)

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Invasive Plant Cleanup at Hudson’s Bay Wetland Nature Park, August 11
Twelve dedicated volunteers turned out on August 11 on very short notice, to remove invasive plants. They deadheaded common tansy and Canada Thistle. At least one hardy member of the party used a pickaxe to remove tansy roots as well as roots of a purple campanula that is expanding its reach near the observation deck closest to the footbridge. They also removed tansy on the north side of the channel east of Queensway. The amount of tansy at this location appears to be diminishing from year to year, thanks to the combined efforts of the City of Prince George, the Northwest Invasive Plant Council and the PG Naturalists Club.
Notes
Ancient Forest Celebration, Saturday September 1, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Ancient Forest Celebration.jpg