PGNC News and Notes, June 23, 2019

  • Wednesday Walk, June 26, Pidherny Trails off Upper Parking Lot
  • PGNC Memberships, New and Renewals
  • Viburnum Leaf Beetle correction
  • Report on June 12 Wednesday Walk, McMillan Creek Regional Park
  • UNBC Cat Study
  • City of Prince George Climate Mitigation Plan, Public Participation Session, Thursday July 11
  • Inspiring Nature, Inspired Technology: Biomimicry and Transportation
  • Alpine Club of Canada

Club Events and News

Prince George Naturalists Club, Wednesday Walk, June 26, Pidherny Trails off Upper Parking Lot

Join us for a walk along the upper level of Pidherny. This is a trail with some ups and downs, but no long climbs. The variety of habitats ensures a variety of species, with a chance to see more Mountain Ladyslipper and Single Delight, and to spot a Bald Eagle. To sign a waiver and arrange car-pooling, meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5thAvenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. for a 9:30 a.m. departure time, with return in the noon hour. Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to members and non-members. For more information, or to join an email contact list contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca.

PGNC Memberships, New and Renewals

The membership year runs from January 1 to December 31. Costis $25 per year for individuals, $40 for a family, and $15 for students. Information including payment by PayPal is available at: https://pgnc.wordpress.com/membership/You can also join the Club or renew your membership at the presentation night on May 16. If you’re not sure if your membership is up to date, you can check with Sandra Kinsey at sjkinsey@direct.ca.

Benefits of membership: Subscription to BC Nature magazine,liabiity insurance coverage for Club field trips, 10% discount on bird seed purchased at Spruce Capital Feeds, and access to popular events limited to members only.

Viburnum Leaf Beetle Correction

The last issue of the newsletter incorrectly identifiedViburnum edule as the bush cranberry being attacked by Viburnum Leaf Beetle. Club member Jack Bowling advises that the Viburnum under attack is actuallyViburnum opulus var. americanum, the species of viburnum most common east of the Rockies, and also called Highbush Cranberry. It has slowly spread into central BC over the past 60 or 70 years and now is everywhere in Cottonwood Island Park. The beetle seems to be specific to the eastern viburnum and is leaving Viburnum edulealone. See the maps and photos for each species on e-Flora: http://ibis.geog.ubc.ca/biodiversity/eflora/

Club Reports 

June 12 Wednesday Walk, McMillan Creek Regional Park

Report by Dora Hunter: It was a fine sunny day. The birds were co-operative, more than a dozen plants were added to our checklist, and the bugs were not overwhelming. We walked both the upper, drier, sunnier trail and the lower, damper, shadier trail; increasing the diversity of wildlife seen. In addition to those plants in Miguel’s photos, some others we saw were Mountain Ladyslipper, Blunt-leaved Sandwort, Bunchberry, Spreading Dogbane, Wild Lily-of-the-valley, Single Delight and the tall American Highbush Cranberry. Columbine, with its bright colours and tubular aspect has evolved to be most efficiently pollinated by hummingbirds. There is no mistaking the Canada Violet with its yellow throat and striped lateral and lower petals. The attractive Yellow Salsify is listed by the Invasive Plant Council of B.C. as an unregulated invasive plant of concern. My thanks go to Bonnie for helping to pre-walk the trails and to Miguel for his photos.

We heard/saw 23 species. Of special interest were all the redstarts. Some participants even watched one female for a while. A pair of Western Tanagers put on a show in the tops of some aspen trees. Here is Sandra’s bird species list for the day.

Hammond’s Flycatcher

Cassin’s Vireo

Warbling Vireo

Common Raven

Black-capped Chickadee

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Pacific Wren

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Swainson’s Thrush

American Robin

Pine Siskin

Dark-eyed Junco

White-throated Sparrow

Northern Waterthrush

Orange-crowned Warbler

MacGillivray’s Warbler

American Redstart

Magnolia Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Townsend’s Warbler

Western Tanager

 

1 Columbine

2 Canada Violet

3 Yellow Salsify

UNBC Cat Study
Message from Ken Otter at UNBC: We are looking for volunteers to help out for a citizen-science project this summer aimed at understanding predation of domestic cats on Prince George wildlife, and whether commercially-available high-vis collars (BirdsbeSafe.com) work to reduce cat predation on birds. 
We’re interested in people who have a free-roaming cat that returns prey items to your yard/home interested in participating in the study.  We will provide you with a collar, and ask you to log your cat’s outdoor time over four weeks – two weeks while the cat is wearing the collar and two without. We will also ask you to collect/photograph all prey returns during the study so we can see what types of birds/mammals are vulnerable.  Finally, we will ask to put a cat-tracking GPS collar on your cat for several days mid-study so we can get an idea of home ranges, use of greenspaces, as well as where we can search to look for prey that they might not have brought back to your house.
We are primarily looking for households in the Hart, Foothills/Ginters and College Heights neighbourhoods, but will also consider other areas around the city.  At the end of the study, you get to keep the high-vis collar, and we will give you a map of where your cat goes during its wanderings (just for you, we won’t tell others where your cat is going!).  If you are interested in participating, contact catstudy@unbc.ca or ken.otter@unbc.ca.  Please feel free to also spread the word as we need a lot of cats to help us get a handle on this!
Cat Poster
City of Prince George Climate Mitigation Plan, Public Participation Session, Thursday July 11
The City of Prince George is currently in the process of preparing a new Climate Change Mitigation Plan that will assist Prince George in decreasing energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This plan is an update to the 2007 Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management Plan and will involve new local targets aligned with provincial and federal commitments. Please see the media release:

Priority areas have been identified as opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Prince George which include transportation, buildings, waste and food and renewable energy. In Prince George, the burning of fossil fuels (gasoline and diesel) for transportation account for 50% of Prince George’s GHG emissions, the heating of residential, commercial and industrial buildings accounts for 37% and organic waste decomposing in the landfill accounts for 13%.
The City is seeking public input to help prioritize local actions to improve our community, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and fight climate change. Residents of Prince George are encouraged to partake in a public participation session or submit the online survey. Public participation sessions were held on June 12 and June 22. The third and final public participation session will be held on Thursday July 11, from 12 noon to 8 pm. at the Lheidli T’enneh Memorial Park Pavilion.
 
Residents are encouraged to take the online survey which will be available until July 31, 2019 at www.princegeorge.ca/environment. Public input on the priority actions will help shape the City’s new Climate Change Mitigation Plan which will be presented to Council for approval.
Inspiring Nature, Inspired Technology: Biomimicry and Transportation
The Exploration Place has a new travelling exhibition which explores how nature inspires some of the innovative technologies used in transportation. For more information visit: https://tinyurl.com/yxrx3cvg. This exhibition is at the Museum until September 2, 2019.
Alpine Club of Canada
The Alpine Club of Canada is offering its bi-weekly online newsletter, ‘ACC Dispatch’ free to any who would like to receive it (ACC membership is not required). Visit https://tinyurl.com/y5ca3r6q to sign up for the newsletter.
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PGNC News and Notes, June 10, 2019

  • Wednesday Walk, June 12, McMillan Creek Regional Park
  • PGNC Memberships: New and Renewals
  • Prince George Naturalists Club Discussion Group
  • Presentations on Ancient Forest/Chun T’oh Whudujut Park and Slim Creek Park, June 10 and 14
  • Nechako Watershed Public Consultation, 7 p.m., Tuesday June 11, Spruce City Wildlife Hatchery, 1384 River Road
  • City of Prince George, Public Consultation on Climate Mitigation Plan, June 12

Club Events and News

Prince George Naturalists Club, Wednesday Walk, June 12, McMillan Creek Regional Park

We are headed to McMillan Creek Regional Park. The terrain there is more rugged than on many of our walks, with steeper climbs. We’ll tackle them at a moderate pace. A highlight is always the view over the city. Always open to a little social geography, I’ll bring a city map to enhance our viewing. If you are worried about bugs, remember to wear long sleeves, light colours and a hat. To sign a waiver and arrange car-pooling, meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5thAvenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. for a 9:30 a.m. departure time, with return in the noon hour. Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to members and non-members. For more information, or to join an e-mail contact list contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca. For more information about PGNC activities, see: https://pgnc.wordpress.com

PGNC Memberships: New and Renewals

The membership year runs from January 1 to December 31. Costis $25 per year for individuals, $40 for a family, and $15 for students. Information including payment by PayPal is available at: https://pgnc.wordpress.com/membership/You can also join the Club or renew your membership at the presentation night on May 16.
Benefits of membership: Subscription to BC Nature magazine,liabiity insurance coverage for Club field trips, 10% discount on bird seed purchased at Spruce Capital Feeds, and access to popular events limited to members only.
 
Prince George Naturalists Club Discussion Group
Are you on Facebook? Then check out the Club’s discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/805727056166470/There’s a recent post about viburnum leaf beetle demolishing the leaves of High Bush Cranberry,Viburnum edule, in Cottonwood Island Park.

Other Events and News

Presentations on Ancient Forest/Chun T’oh Whudujut Park and Slim Creek Park, June 10 and 14
 
BC Parks and UNBC are holding a one-hour presentation on the two parks on June 10 from 7 to 9 p.m. at UNBC, and on June 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Dome Creek. Full details are in the attached poster.
AF June Public Presentation_final copy 2

Nechako Watershed Public Consultation, 7 p.m., Tuesday June 11, Spruce City Wildlife Hatchery, 1384 River Road

A message from Dustin Snyder, Vice-President, SCWA: Rio Tinto has hired EDI to do a public consultation and interaction about the Nechako watershed. The Spruce City Wildlife Association is hosting a meeting at 7 p.m. on June 11 at the fish hatchery to allow members of the fish and wildlife community to participate in the consultation.

Please let Dustin Snyder, Vice-President SCWA, know if you’ll attend so the room can be set up to accommodate the number in attendance. Email: dustinsnyderscwa@gmail.com. Phone: 250-613-9357.

Draft agenda:

Welcome

Introductions

Purpose of this meeting

Rio Tinto operations overview

Intent of the Water Engagement Initiative (WEI)

Overview of the WEI Planning process

Your potential role

Available resources

Next Steps

City of Prince George Climate Mitigation Plan, Public Participation Sessions, Wednesday June 12, Saturday June 22, Thursday July 11

The City of Prince George is currently in the process of preparing a new Climate Change Mitigation Plan that will assist Prince George in decreasing energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This plan is an update to the 2007 Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management Plan and will involve new local targets aligned with provincial and federal commitments. Please see the media release: https://tinyurl.com/y5g7mk5u

Priority areas have been identified as opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Prince George which include transportation, buildings, waste and food and renewable energy. In Prince George, the burning of fossil fuels (gasoline and diesel) for transportation account for 50% of Prince George’s GHG emissions, the heating of residential, commercial and industrial buildings accounts for 37% and organic waste decomposing in the landfill accounts for 13%.

The City is seeking public input to help prioritize local actions to improve our community, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and fight climate change. Residents of Prince George are encouraged to partake in a public participation session or submit the online survey:

  1. Public Participation Sessions:
    1. Wednesday June 12th – 11:00am to 8:00pm at the Prince George Public Library: 2nd floor of the Bob Harkins Branch. Presentations will occur at 12:15pm, 4:30pm and 7:00pm.
    2. Saturday June 22nd– 8:30am to 2:00pm at the Prince George Farmers Market (3rd Ave. & Quebec St.)
    3. Thursday July 11th– 12:00pm to 8:00pm at the Lheidli T’enneh Memorial Park Pavilion
  1. Take the online survey which will be available until July 31, 2019 at www.princegeorge.ca/environment

Public input on the priority actions will help shape the City’s new Climate Change Mitigation Plan which will be presented to Council for approval.

 

PGNC News and Notes, May 27, 2019

  • Wednesday Walk, June 12, McMillan Creek Regional Park
  • Report on May 22 Wednesday Walk at Ferguson Lake Nature Reserve
  • PGNC Memberships: New and Renewals
  • Survey About Cats in the City, deadline Thursday May 30
  • Provincial Caribou Recovery Agreements, feedback deadline, 4 p.m. on Friday May 31
  • Presentations on Ancient Forest/Chun T’oh Whudujut Park and Slim Creek Park, June 8 to 14

Club Events and News

Wednesday Walk, June 12, McMillan Creek Regional Park

We are headed to McMillan Creek Regional Park. The terrain there is more rugged than on many of our walks, with steeper climbs. We’ll tackle them at a moderate pace. A highlight is always the view over the city. Always open to a little social geography, I’ll bring a city map to enhance our viewing. If you are worried about bugs, remember to wear long sleeves, light colours and a hat. To sign a waiver and arrange car-pooling, meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. for a 9:30 a.m. departure time, with return in the noon hour. Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to members and non-members. For more information, or to join an e-mail contact list contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca.

PGNC Memberships: New and Renewals

The membership year runs from January 1 to December 31. Cost is $25 per year for individuals, $40 for a family, and $15 for students. Information including payment by PayPal is available at: https://pgnc.wordpress.com/membership/ You can also join the Club or renew your membership at the presentation night on May 16.

Benefits of membership: Subscription to BC Nature magazine, liabiity insurance coverage for Club field trips, 10% discount on bird seed purchased at Spruce Capital Feeds, and access to popular events limited to members only.

Club Reports

May 22 Wednesday Walk, Ferguson Lake Nature Reserve

With four expert birders in attendance, we had another walk with a focus on birds. Sandra, who led the way, said there were no particularly outstanding sightings, but twenty-nine species was a good count. Most numerous were the Golden-crowned Kinglet with the high seee-seee and the loud Northern Waterthrush. Here is her list:

Ring-necked Duck

Bufflehead

Ruffed Grouse

Red-necked Grebe

Hairy Woodpecker

Hammond’s Flycatcher

Dusky Flycatcher

Warbling Vireo

Common Raven

Black-capped Chickadee

Red-breasted Nuthatch

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Swainson’s Thrush

American Robin

Pine Siskin

Dark-eyed Junco

White-throated Sparrow

Song Sparrow

Lincoln’s Sparrow

Red-winged Blackbird

Northern Waterthrush

Orange-crowned Warbler

MacGillivray’s Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

American Redstart

Yellow Warbler

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Western Tanager

 Not only is Ferguson Lake home to a cattail marsh, a shrub swamp and pond lily areas, it has a bog of considerable size. To be found there are Bog Laurel (Kalmia microphylla ssp occidentalis), Labrador Tea (Ledum groenlandicum), Bog Cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccos) and Scrub Birch (Betula glandulosa). The Bog Cranberry, in particular, was suffering from our drought. On the trail we spotted, in bloom, Rosy Twistedstalk (Streptopus roseus), False Solomon’s-seal (Similacina racemose), and Baneberry (Actaea rubra). Bog Laurel and Baneberry are both very toxic. My photos of Bog Laurel in bloom (pink) and, to its left, Labrador Tea in bud; and, on the trail, Baneberry, and Wood Horsetail (Equisetum sylvaticum) with its spore spike follow (Submitted by Dora Hunter).

1 Bog Laurel

2 Baneberry

3 Wood Horsetail

Other Events and News
 
Survey about Cats in the City: Deadline to respond is Thursday May 30, 2019
 
Invitation from Annie Booth, Ken Otter and Dan Ryan: UNBC researchers want to know what you think about pet cats in the City of Prince George. Researchers are working in partnership with local veterinarians, humane agencies and the City of Prince George to study public opinion around pet cats. Researchers are looking at what people think about domestic cats and cat management as well as issues around welfare.
Love cats? Own cats? Don’t like cats much at all? UNBC researchers want to hear from you! Log into an online survey by copying this link into your browser: https:/ca.research.net/r/unbccat. The survey should take about 20 minutes and is completely anonymous. As a thank-you for your time, provide us with contact information (which we will destroy once the survey is complete) and we will enter your name in a draw for one of two $250 Visa Prepaid credid cards. For more information, contact catstudy@unbc.ca.
 
Provincial Caribou Recovery Agreements: Feedback deadline is 4 p.m. on Friday May 31
 
The provincial government is seeking feedback regarding two caribou recovery agreements for the southern mountain caribou. Public information sessions have been held in several northern communities including Prince George. If you missed the information session or want to contribute more feedback, the deadline has been extended to 4 p.m. on Friday May 31. Here is the link to extensive information on the draft agreement: https://engage.gov.bc.ca/caribou/section11agreement/. It includes a link to the online feedback form.
 
Presentations on Ancient Forest/Chun T’oh Whudujut Park and Slim Creek Park, June 8 to 14
 
BC Parks and UNBC are holding a one-hour presentation on the two parks on June 8 from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Robson Valley, on June 10 from 7 to 9 p.m. at UNBC, and on June 14, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Dome Creek. Full details are in the attached poster.
AF June Public Presentation_final copy 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PGNC News and Notes, May 15, 2019

  • Long-term glyphosate persistence in forested environments, what do we really know? Thursday May 16, 7 to 9 p.m., The Exploration Place
  • Wednesday Walk, May 22, Ferguson Lake Nature Park
  • PGNC Memberships: New and Renewals
  • Report on May 8 Wednesday Walk, Moore’s Meadow Nature Park
  • Survey about Cats in the City, deadline is Thursday May 30, 2019
  • Provincial Caribou Recovery Agreements, feedback deadline, 4 p.m. on Friday May 31
  • Study on Morel Mushroom Foraging
  • Canadian Cartographic Association 44th Annual Conference, May 22 to 25 at UNBC

Club Events

Prince George Naturalists Club Presentation: Long-term glyphosate persistence in forested environments, what do we really know? Thursday May 16, 7 to 9 p.m., The Exploration Place

Persistent, non-lethal doses of glyphosate-based herbicides in plant tissue may have implications for the non-timber forest products, including edible and/or medicinal plants, and for the natural food chain. The risks associated with long-term, low-level glyphosate persistence in living plants are mostly unknown. The research explored here will discuss the real-life timelines associated with molecular glyphosate presence in plant tissues, and how glyphosate behaves in a forested environment. Dr. Lisa Wood, Assistant Professor, Ecosystem Science and Management at UNBC, will share some current research she is conducting on glyphosate-based herbicides in different plant tissues, and pose questions about what her results may mean for land management around herbicide use. This event is presented in partnership with The Exploration Place. It’s for PGNC members only. Memberships will be available at the door.

Wednesday Walk, May 22, Ferguson Lake Nature Park

The trail is an easy 3 km walk around the lake, passing through a variety of natural habitats and past several historical sites. To sign a waiver and arrange car-pooling, meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. for a 9:30 a.m. departure time, with return in the noon hour.  Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to Club members and non-members. For more information, or to join an email contact list contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca

PGNC Memberships: New and Renewals

The membership year runs from January 1 to December 31. Cost is $25 per year for individuals, $40 for a family, and $15 for students. Information including payment by PayPal is available at: https://pgnc.wordpress.com/membership/ You can also join the Club or renew your membership at the presentation night on May 16.

Benefits of membership: Subscription to BC Nature magazine, liability insurance coverage for Club field trips, 10% discount on bird seed purchased at Spruce Capital Feeds, and access to popular events limited to members only.

Club Reports

May 8 Wednesday Walk, Moore’s Meadow Nature Park

The highlight of the day was birding with Sandra Kinsey. Here is her birding report:
Besides the now-ubiquitous Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Yellow-rumped Warblers, we had a few Orange-crowned Warblers and Dark-eyed Juncos, great looks at a Violet-green Swallow with a nearby male Rufous Hummingbird like a beacon on top of a spruce; Northern Flicker and Pileated Woodpecker calls for comparison, and the first of migrating Savannah Sparrow and Townsend’s Warbler.

Rufous Hummingbird
sapsucker sp (probably Red-breasted Sapsucker)
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker
flycatcher sp (Hammond’s or Dusky)
American Crow
Common Raven

Violet-green Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Townsend’s Warbler
Savannah Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
House Finch
Pine Siskin
Evening Grosbeak

Walkers were greeted by Fairybells and Pussy Willow in full bloom (photos Miguel); and by some early Tall Oregon-Grape (photo Anne Allgaier). The first blue violets were also spotted. Miguel’s butterfly photo catches a Spring Azure mudding. Primarily the males of many species of butterflies and other insects gather nutritional minerals from these damp sites. These minerals are then transferred at mating, producing stronger progeny. The ants on the north-facing slope, where a skiff of icy snow remained, were still at the basking-on-the-patio stage, whereas those on the south-facing slope were busy foraging on the trails.

1 Fairybells

2 Pussy Willow

3 Oregon Grape

4 Spring Azure

Other Events and News

 
Survey about Cats in the City, deadline is Thursday May 30, 2019
UNBC researchers want to know what you think about pet cats in the City of Prince George. Researchers are working in partnership with local veterinarians, humane agencies and the City of Prince George to study public opinion around pet cats. Researchers are looking at what people think about domestic cats and cat management as well as issues around welfare.
Love cats, own cats, don’t like cats much at all? UNBC researchers want to hear from you! Log into an online survey at https:/ca.research.net/r/unbccat. For more information, contact catstudy@unbc.ca.
Provincial Caribou Recovery Agreements, feedback deadline, 4 p.m., Friday May 31
 
The provincial government is seeking feedback regarding two caribou recovery agreements for the southern mountain caribou. Public information sessions have been held in several northern communities including Prince George. If you missed the information session or want to contribute more feedback, the deadline has been extended to 4 p.m. on Friday May 31. Here is the link to extensive information on the draft agreement: https://engage.gov.bc.ca/caribou/section11agreement/. It includes a link to the online feedback form.
 
Study on Morel Mushroom Foraging
 
Carley-Jane Stanton is a PhD researcher from the University of Oxford, UK, originally from Edmonton, Alberta. She has asked the PGNC for assistance with her research so we are passing her information along to all our readers. If you can help with her research, please call her local phone number at 780-245-1692 or email her at carley.stanton@ouce.ox.ac.uk
 
Here is her request: I am doing a study on morel mushroom foraging following wildfires in Western Canada, and I expect there will be many morels and pickers in your area in the next few months. I was wondering if I could chat with someone from the Prince George Naturalists Club about the wildfire season in 2018, and any plans you have for engaging with the upcoming flush of morel mushrooms in the region and commercial mushroom pickers entering your area. Do you have any plans as an organization to get out and pick morels? Any members of your club that are keen? I’d love to hear your perspective!

Thank you so much and I look forward to hearing from you,

Carley-Jane Stanton, MPhil., DPhil. Candidate, Geography and the Environment
School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford. tel: +44 07449 375007
 
Canadian Cartographic Association 44th Annual Conference, May 22 to 25 at UNBC
 
The Association is meeting at UNBC from May 22 to May 25. Here’s the link for mapping enthusiasts: https://tinyurl.com/y4zgl4dt. During that time, and for the following week, the public is invited to UNBC to explore a giant floor map and a 3D virtual reality sandbox. Thanks to Roger Wheate who passed this information along for the enjoyment of everyone who likes to play with maps.

 

 

 

 

PGNC News and Notes, April 28, 2019

  • Wednesday Walk, May 8, Moore’s Meadow Nature Park
  • Long-Billed Curlews, Monday May 13, Prince George Public Library
  • Long-term glyphosate persistence in forested environments, what do we really know? Thursday May 16, The Exploration Place
  • PGNC memberships: new and renewals
  • Report on April 24 Wednesday Walk, L.C. Gunn Park
  • The Bears are Back in Town, Wednesday May 1, Prince George Public Library
  • City of Prince George Water Week Open House, Thursday May 9, Hudson’s Bay Wetland Nature Park
  • Provincial Caribou Recovery Agreements, feedback deadline, 4 p.m., Friday May 31
  • Wolverine Watch

Club Events

Wednesday Walk, May 8, Moore’s Meadow Nature Park
As a special treat, Sandra Kinsey will lead our Walk, which will have as a highlight the spring migration as seen on the paths of Moore’s Meadow Nature Park. There are a few hills encountered on this walk, but much of it will be on level terrain. To sign a waiver and arrange car-pooling, meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. for a 9:30 a.m. departure time, with return in the noon hour. Passengers are asked to contribute $4.00 for gas. Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to members and non-members. For more information, or to join an email contact list contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca.
Presentation on Long-Billed Curlews, Monday May 13, 7 to 9 p.m., Prince George Public Library
Bird Studies Canada is currently planning a research project on Long-billed Curlews in the Prince George-Vanderhoof region for the summer of 2019. The project is assessing the migration and habitat threats to this species in BC. Everyone is welcome to attend this free public event which is co-sponsored by the Prince George Naturalists Club and Bird Studies Canada.
Long-term glyphosate persistence in forested environments, what do we really know? Thursday May 16, 7 to 9 p.m., The Exploration Place
 
Persistent, non-lethal doses of glyphosate-based herbicides in plant tissue may have implications for the non-timber forest products, including edible and/or medicinal plants, and for the natural food chain. The risks associated with long-term, low-level glyphosate persistence in living plants are mostly unknown. The research explored here will discuss the real-life timelines associated with molecular glyphosate presence in plant tissues, and how glyphosate behaves in a forested environment. Dr. Lisa Wood, Assistant Professor, Ecosystem Science and Management at UNBC, will share some current research she is conducting on glyphosate-based herbicides in different plant tissues, and pose questions about what her results may mean for land management around herbicide use. This event is presented in partnership with The Exploration Place. It’s for members only and memberships will be available at the door.
PGNC Memberships: New and Renewals
 
The membership year runs from January 1 to December 31. Cost is $25 per year for individuals, $40 for a family, and $15 for students. Information including payment by PayPal is available at: https://pgnc.wordpress.com/membership/ You can also join the Club or renew your membership at the presentation night on May 16.
Benefits of membership: Subscription to BC Nature magazine, liabiity insurance coverage for Club field trips, 10% discount on bird seed purchased at Spruce Capital Feeds, and access to popular events limited to members only.

Club Reports

April 24 Wednesday Walk, L.C. Gunn Park
It was a chilly, windy day, with cold walkers and much swaying of trees as we made our way along the cutbank. The clearer waters of the Nechako and the silty of the Fraser were apparent. Miguel’s photos capture the remnants of last season, a few berries of the Highbush Cranberry; and the promise of the season to come, Soopolallie flowers. Using our guide book, (MacKinnon, Pojar, Coupe. 1992—99. Plants of Northern British Columbia), we identified the Soopolallie using the Keys to Deciduous Shrubs and Young Trees in Winter. Male and female flowers occur on separate plants. These are the male, or staminate, flowers. Sandra K. identified several migrating birds: Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Yellow-rumped Warbler and White-crowned sparrow. While all three species breed in this area, most birds will pass through to northern Canada and Alaska, having travelled north from the southern USA and Mexico. The first two prefer to nest in conifers and may be high in the tree. White-crowned sparrows, frequent tundra dwellers, choose low shrubs, mosses and lichens.
1 High Bush Cranberry
2 Soopalali Flowers

Other Events and News

 
The Bears are Back in Town, Wednesday May 1, 7 to 9 p.m., Prince George Public Library
Local bears are now emerging from their winter dens. Join the Northern Bear Awareness Society’s Haneef Adulareheem for an informative and entertaining lecture all about bears, so you can feel prepared to coexist with the bears in our city. We will, of course, also be happy to chat about the City’s renewed interest in becoming a Bear Smart Community, and what this means to Prince George residents. Find us at the PG Public Library, in the Keith Gordon Room on Wednesday May 1 at 7 p.m. Please spread the word and share this event with your friends!
 
City of Prince George Water Week Open House, Thursday May 9, 1 to 3 p.m., Hudson’s Bay Wetland Nature Park, 2232 Queensway Street
 
The City of Prince George is holding an open house on the City’s stormwater system and its connection to the natural environment, from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Hudson’s Bay Wetland Nature Park. Come and learn about the water that flows through the Hudson’s Bay Wetland and into the Fraser River.
Provincial Caribou Recovery Agreements, feedback deadline, 4 p.m. on Friday May 31
 
The provincial government is seeking feedback regarding two caribou recovery agreements for the southern mountain caribou. Public information sessions have been held in several northern communities including Prince George. If you missed the information session or want to contribute more feedback, the deadline has been extended to 4 p.m. on Friday May 31. Here is the link to extensive information on the draft agreement https://engage.gov.bc.ca/caribou/section11agreement/. It includes a link to the online feedback form.
Wolverine Watch
Mike Nash forwarded this link to a research project about wolverines in the Rocky Mountains:

PGNC Event, Sunday April 28

Cleanup at Hudson’s Bay Wetland Nature Park, Sunday April 28, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Come and help us beautify our city by volunteering to clean up refuse! The Prince George Naturalists Club has adopted the Hudson’s Bay Wetland again for this year’s city-wide spring cleaning event. Meet us any time between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Sunday April 28 at the HBW parking lot at 2232 Queensway Street. Participants are encouraged to bring their own work gloves and sturdy footwear. Garbage bags and disposable gloves are provided. Refreshments will be available at 10 a.m. for those who want get a jump on cleaning. We hope to see you there!
HBW Nature Park sign

PGNC News and Notes, April 15, 2019

Club Events

Biodiversity in the Inland Rainforest – Why the Rocky Mountain Trench is a Special Place to Live, Thursday April 18, 7 to 9 p.m. The Exploration Place
 
The Fraser River east of Prince George flows through the Rocky Mountain Trench, a broad east-west trending valley (often called the Robson Valley) between the younger Rocky Mountains to the north, and the older Cariboo-Columbia Mountains to the south. While most of the mountain valleys north and south of the Rocky Mountain Trench are narrow glacially carved valleys, often dominated by cold air drainage and relatively few areas of productive soils, the Rocky Mountain Trench provides extensive areas of warm mid-slope habitats, where deep deposits of post-glacial sediments nurture rich plant communities. When combined with the phenomena of orographic uplift, where greater precipitation is deposited as storm systems rise over the inland mountain ranges, the resultant inland rainforest communities show exceptional biodiversity. UNBC Professor Darwyn Coxson will lead us in a talk to explore this biodiversity and the rare plant communities that call the Robson Valley home. This talk is presented in partnership with The Exploration Place, and is open to everyone.
 
Wednesday Walkers, April 24, L.C. Gunn Park
We will visit L.C. Gunn Park, restricting our walk to the lower levels with modest hills close to the parking lot and wonderful views of the rivers and city. To sign a waiver and arrange car-pooling, meet in the parking lot at the Spruceland Shopping Mall at the corner of 5th Avenue and Hwy 97 under the big Save On Foods sign at 9:20 a.m. for a 9:30 a.m. departure time, with return in the noon hour. Passengers are asked to contribute $4.00 for gas.  Please dress for the weather, wear sturdy footwear, bring water and a snack. These slow walks to observe nature are open to members and non-members. For more information, or to join an email contact list contact Dora at hunterdora@shaw.ca.

Cleanup at Hudson’s Bay Wetland Nature Park, Sunday April 28, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Come and help us beautify our city by volunteering to clean up refuse! The Prince George Naturalists Club has adopted the Hudson’s Bay Wetland again for this year’s city-wide spring cleaning event. Meet us any time between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Sunday April 28 at the HBW parking lot at 2232 Queensway Street. Participants are encouraged to bring their own work gloves and sturdy footwear. Garbage bags and disposable gloves are provided. Refreshments will be available at 10 a.m. for those who want get a jump on cleaning. We hope to see you there!
Thursday May 16, Presentation Night, 7 to 9 p.m., The Exploration Place
This final presentation night of the spring season is for members only! Reserve the date and watch for details coming soon.
PGNC Memberships: New and Renewals
The membership year runs from January 1 to December 31. Cost is $25 per year for individuals, $40 for a family, and $15 for students. Information including payment by PayPal is available at: https://pgnc.wordpress.com/membership/ You can also join the Club or renew your membership at the presentation nights on April 18 and May 16.
Benefits of membership: Subscription to BC Nature magazine, liabiity insurance coverage for Club field trips, 10% discount on bird seed purchased at Spruce Capital Feeds, and access to popular events limited to members only.

Club Reports

April 10 Cottonwood Island Nature Park
Tucked between much-needed rain showers, our fourth season of Wednesday Walks got off to a fine start at Cottonwood Island Nature Park. Sandra Kinsey, with her scope, gave us views of Barrow’s GoldeneyeBufflehead, the gulls on the far sandbar and the nest of the Bald eagles. Both ducks breed in this area and are tree cavity nesters. The Bufflehead often uses old Flicker nests. The Vireo nest, a remnant from last summer and typical of all Vireos, is hung from a horizontal V on a branch. Sandra E’s photo of the nest shows the grasses, Balsam Poplar catkins and Witch’s Hair lichens used in the construction. Angie’s photo of the Witch’s Hair and other lichens catches them enjoying the early spring, open tree canopy, giving them the benefit of full sun for a few more weeks. Our first flowers of the season were the Mountain Alder catkins. Miguel’s photo shows the pendulous male flowers and the tiny red female flowers that will go on to produce the brown mature catkins.
1 Vireo Nest
2 Witches Hair
3 Mountain Alder Catkins

Other Events and News

Foraging and Wildcrafting, Wednesday April 24, 7 p.m., Room 7-150 UNBC
 
Join Jennifer, a Wild Craft Guide, on this one-hour presentation about the plants and fungi in Prince George and surrounding area. Learn about the three uses of foraged plants and fungi. Understand the five ‘rights’ of wildcrafting. Presented by Moose, Mushrooms, and Mud in partnership with the David Douglas Botanical Garden Society.
 
Northwest Invasive Plant Council at the Home and Garden Show, April 26 to 28
NWIPC is seeking volunteers to help at their booth at the Home and Garden Show. Contact Penni Adams, Program Manager, at manager@nwipc.org if you would like to help out.
The Bears are Back in Town, Wednesday May 1, 7 to 9 p.m., Prince George Public Library
Local bears are now emerging from their winter dens. Join the Northern Bear Awareness Society’s Haneef Adulareheem for an informative and entertaining lecture all about bears, so you can feel prepared to coexist with the bears in our city. We will, of course, also be happy to chat about the City’s renewed interest in becoming a Bear Smart Community, and what this means to Prince George residents. Find us at the PG Public Library, in the Keith Gordon Room on Wednesday May 1 at 7pm. Please spread the word and share this event with your friends!
Provincial Caribou Recovery Agreements, feedback deadline, 4 p.m. on FRIDAY MAY 31
 
The provincial government is seeking feedback regarding two caribou recovery agreements for the southern mountain caribou. Public information sessions have been held in several northern communities including Prince George. If you missed the information session or want to contribute more feedback, the deadline is now 4 p.m. on Friday May 31. Here is the link to extensive information on the draft agreement https://engage.gov.bc.ca/caribou/section11agreement/. It includes a link to the online feedback form.

Jasper National Park Public Input Opportunity This Month

Report from Mike Nash: Jasper National Park is beginning the rocess of updating their ten-year management plan, which by law must be tabled in the federal parliament late next year, 2020. They are currently in the public input phase, which closes at the end of this month, April 30 2019. You can also provide input on Banff, Yoho, Kootenay, Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks if you wish, but Jasper is our nearest Rocky Mountain National Park which most of us use from time to time, and it deserves a few minutes of our time. Any input that you care to provide this month will potentially affect the updated management plan, which will guide the management of the park until 2030. On top of all this, Jasper is currently engaged in major capital infrastructure projects upgrading roads, campsites, bridges, trails etc., and is also dealing with a massive mountain pine beetle infestation that will utterly change the face of the park in the next few years. So, if you have any ideas or beefs from your use of the park over the past decade, or other suggestions or ideas going forward, now is your chance. There will be a second round of public input at a later date, but that will only be to comment on the draft plan once it’s written. To comment on any of these iconic national parks, go to https://www.letstalkmountainparks.ca/ or to comment specifically on Jasper go to https://www.letstalkmountainparks.ca/jasper.
Last week I attended the annual public forum in Jasper, and if you have any questions from that, you are welcome to email me at pgoutdoors@telus.net. Otherwise, if you would like to see the latest annual report that was presented at the well-attended meeting go to: https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/jasper/info/plan/rapports-reports/2018.
This public forum is held each spring in Jasper and Edmonton. If you would like to see it also held in British Columbia’s closest major city, Prince George, please say so in your management plan submission above.
One final note of interest: the large Whistlers campground in Jasper is being completely rebuilt with all new facilities and a new visitor centre and will be closed for the entire 2019 season. Camping accommodation in Jasper will therefore be very tight this year, and prospective visitors are urged to book early.